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11 Superfoods That Stand the Test of Time

When it comes to healthy eating, it can be hard to separate superfood from superfad, but these 11 miracle munchies have proven again and again to deliver serious bang for their nutrition buck.

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Blueberries boost brainpower!

These natural sweet treats are loaded with antioxidants and vitamin C, which help fight disease, as well as anthocyanins, which has been shown to increase brain functions. (These are delicious eats you didn’t realize were superfoods.)

BroccoliBukhta Ihor/Shutterstock

Broccoli protects your bladder!

Remember all those times your mother told you to eat your broccoli? Well, she might have been on to something. Cruciferous vegetables have been shown to protect against bladder cancer.

Garlic. Garlic Cloves and Garlic Bulb in vintage wooden bowl.Marian Weyo/Shutterstock

Garlic guards your colon!

This antioxidant-rich food is not only flavorful but can reduce your risk of developing colon tumors. Try these tricks to make your superfoods even healthier.

FlaxseedAlexandra F/Shutterstock

Flaxseeds battle breast cancer!

These small brown seeds are packed with fiber and loaded with lignans, which have been shown to slow tumor growth in women with breast cancer. They also contain magnesium to help control blood sugar, and omega-3 fatty acids to lower triglycerides and reduce inflammation.

tofuGayvoronskaya Yana/Shutterstock

Soy strengthens your bones!

Tofu and other soy products aren’t just for vegetarians. Consuming soy can reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer, lower cholesterol, and boost your bone strength. It can even help with hot flashes in menopausal women. (These are the 13 superfoods that every woman needs in her diet.)

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Pomegranate reduces inflammation!

Pomegranate juice can reduce cancer-causing inflammation in the body and stave off the progression of coronary heart disease. Drink it plain, or add some pomegranate juice to this energy-boosting fruit salad, which also fights wrinkles.

Coffee beans with chocolate and dark chocolate . Broken slices of chocolate. Chocolate bar pieces. Coffee beans.Avdeyukphoto/Shutterstock

Dark chocolate reduces stress!

Not like you need an excuse to indulge in dark chocolate, but a few ounces a day of the concentrated, 75% cocoa stuff, can actually lower your bad cholesterol, prevent your arteries from clogging, and reduce stress. These are the most powerful spring superfoods you can find.

TomatoesPinkyone/Shutterstock

Tomatoes fight cancer!

These juicy red vegetables are packed with lycopene, a carotenoid known to lower your risk for developing many kinds of cancers, as well as heart disease. Studies found that cooking tomatoes actually makes the lycopene much more potent.

BeansCraevschii Family /Shutterstock

Beans clean out your system!

Whether you’re meat-free or not, beans are a healthy protein alternative, containing a hearty amount of fiber to help keep your system moving. They’re also full of B vitamins to protect your heart and relieve stress, and iron and calcium.

Fresh green baby spinach leaves in a bowl on a rustic wooden table close upNatali Zakharova/Shutterstock

Green leafy veggies protect your eyes!

Dark leafy greens like spinach, Swiss chard, and kale are true superfoods, packed with iron, beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, folate, and calcium, all essential for a strong, healthy body. They also contain lutein, which can protect against macular degeneration and cataracts.

salmonPlateresca/Shutterstock

Fish keep your heart healthy!

Fish like salmon and mackerel are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to lower the risk of heart disease, decrease inflammation in the body, and even improve brain function. If you can’t eat fish, nuts like almonds and walnuts are a good alternative with the same powerful results. (If you want to boost your brain power, you need to add these superfoods to your diet.)

Alyssa Jung
Alyssa Jung is a writer and editor with extensive experience creating health and wellness content that resonates with readers. She freelanced for local publications in Upstate New York and spent three years as a newspaper reporter before moving to New York City to pursue a career in magazines. She is currently Senior Associate Editor at Prevention magazine and a contributor to Prevention.com. Previously she worked at Reader's Digest as an editor, writer, and health fact checker.