Avocado Oil Mayo vs. Regular Mayo: Is One Healthier Than the Other?

Every editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links. Ratings and prices are accurate and items are in stock as of time of publication.

Here are the nutrition and benefits of avocado oil mayonnaise, how it stacks up against regular mayo, and a few favorite brands to try.

The rising popularity of avocado oil mayonnaise

Some people baked sourdough and turned browning bananas into banana bread during the Covid-19 pandemic. Others, it seems, broadened their home cooking with a little mayo.

Mayonnaise sales increased as more consumers made meals at home during the pandemic, according to a 2021 report from market research firm IBIS World.

If you’re a fan of this creamy concoction, you’re probably aware that mayo is traditionally made with oil, eggs, vinegar, and lemon.

Soybean oil is the usual choice, but now there’s a new kid on the block. Mayonnaise made with avocado oil is sprouting up at numerous markets and online grocers.

The driver: America’s avocado obsession.

Avocados are a hot commodity in the United States. The demand for the decadent but healthful “butter fruit” has climbed steadily, with a triple increase in per capita consumption since 2001, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

This growing avocado admiration has led to a range of new products made with avocado oil, from chips to condiments. Apart from being trendy, these products may offer key health benefits.

One thing to keep in mind if you follow a vegan or plant-based diet—most avocado mayo contains eggs (more on that in a bit). If that’s important to you, check the label to look for products made without animal-based ingredients.

Here’s everything you need to know about avocado oil mayo, its health benefits, how to shop for it, and my favorite brands to buy.

Avocado oil mayo vs. regular mayo

If you’re wondering whether avocado oil mayo is healthier than regular mayo, it’s complicated.

Currently, there isn’t research that compares the health outcomes of replacing polyunsaturated fat (in regular mayo) with monounsaturated fat (in avocado oil mayo). However, there is a multitude of research on the benefits of adding avocado oil to your diet.

From a strictly nutritional standpoint, here’s how avocado oil and typical mayo stack up:

Avocado oil mayo nutrition facts

Below are the nutrients and percent of recommended daily value (DV) for one tablespoon (15 grams) of Primal Kitchen’s avocado oil vegan mayo, which doesn’t contain eggs.

Calories: 90

Total fat: 11 g (14 percent DV)

Sodium: 125 milligrams (5 percent DV)

Carbohydrates: 0 g (0 percent DV)

Sugars: 0 g (0 percent DV)

Protein: 0 g (0 percent DV)

Regular mayo nutrition facts

Below are the nutrients and percentages of DV for one tablespoon (13.8 g) of regular mayo salad dressing.

Calories: 94

Total fat: 10 g (13 percent DV)

Sodium: 88 mg (4 percent DV)

Carbohydrates: 0.1 g (0 percent DV)

Sugars: 0 g (0 percent DV)

Protein: 0 g (0 percent DV)

Diverse Keto Disheslisegagne/Getty Images

Benefits of avocado oil

Avocados are remarkably good for you, as is the oil derived from the fruit.

Nearly 70 percent of the fat extracted from avocado comes from monounsaturated fatty acids, or MUFAs, with a lower ratio from polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids, according to a 2019 study in the journal Molecules.

Monounsaturated fat was first discovered as beneficial during the 1960s, when researchers found that residents in Mediterranean countries experienced a low rate of heart disease despite consuming a high-fat diet.

They learned that the main fat consumed in the region was monounsaturated fat, which led to the understanding that not all fats are created equal.

For heart protection, the majority of the fat you consume daily—20 percent of your total calories—should come from monounsaturated fat, per the National Institutes of Health’s National Cholesterol Education Program.

MUFAs have also been shown in research to support blood sugar regulation and healthy weight management, including reductions in waist circumference, according to studies published in Diabetes Care and Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, respectively.

But before you run out (or log on) to buy a jar of avocado oil mayo, there a few things to keep in mind.

How to shop for avocado oil mayo

While avocado oil mayo can be heart healthy, it’s important to note that not all products are made the same way.

Your first stop when evaluating any product should be the ingredient list.

One popular brand’s ingredients include avocado oil, followed by canola and soybean oils, even though only avocado is in the product’s name.

To best benefit from the healthful MUFAs avocados provide, look for products made solely with avocado oil.

And keep in mind that not all avocado mayo is all natural. Avocados are associated with wholesomeness, but some brands use artificial preservatives in their formulation.

The only way to scope this out is to be a label sleuth. Look for brands made with simple, recognizable ingredients.

Finally, as we mentioned, if you follow a vegan or plant-based diet, be aware that most avocado mayo contains eggs, as this ingredient is part of the standard of identity for mayo.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, “standard of identity” is an agreed-upon legal definition for what a food actually is.

That said, there are vegan options for avocado mayo (see below) that contain no eggs or other animal-derived additives.

Healthy ways to use avocado mayo

Mayo can be used in a variety of ways, including as a spread, dip, dressing, or ingredient in dishes like potato salad and slaw.

You can even bake avocado oil mayo into goodies like moist cakes, cookies, and brownies.

To best take advantage of the health benefits of avocado oil mayo, pair it with whole, plant-based foods.

Instead of a traditional BLT (bacon, lettuce, and tomato), make an updated version using whole grain bread, roasted eggplant slices in place of bacon, and avocado oil mayo.

Incorporate avocado oil mayo into chilled protein salads made with white beans or chickpeas as stand-ins for animal protein.

Toss the mayo with a variety of chopped veggies and either spaghetti squash or spiralized zucchini as an alternative to macaroni salad, or use pasta made from brown rice, quinoa, or lentils.

Use a dollop of avocado oil mayo to flavor a variety of plant foods, from roasted corn on the cob to fingerling potatoes, roasted artichokes, and grilled vegetable skewers.

A nutritionist’s top picks

The variety of avocado oil mayo on the market is impressive. In addition to vegan options, you’ll also find flavored varieties.

Tasty choices include jalapeno lime, rosemary garlic, wasabi, and harissa.

Here are four brands I recommend based on their overall quality and top-notch ingredients, including no additional oils.

Primal Kitchen Vegan Mayovia amazon.com

Primal Kitchen Vegan Mayo

Shop Now

This 100 percent plant-based mayo’s first ingredient is avocado oil, blended simply with water, organic vinegar, salt, potato protein, and mustard oil.

Of the 11 grams of fat per tablespoon, 7 grams come from monounsaturated fat, with zero carbs and just 125 milligrams of sodium, 5 percent of the maximum daily limit.

Primal Kitchen also makes a few flavored vegan mayo versions, in addition to four non-vegan varieties, all made with avocado oil.


Chosen Foods Classic Avocado Oil Mayovia amazon.com

Chosen Foods Classic Avocado Oil Mayo

Shop Now

Chosen Foods makes eight versions of avocado oil mayo (with flavors including roasted garlic), including a vegan and an organic option.

Each is made with simple ingredients that celebrate avocado oil as the star.

The brand’s website also includes a blog with recipes that incorporate the mayo and other avocado-based products.


Sir Kensingtons Avocado Oil Mayovia amazon.com

Sir Kensington’s Avocado Oil Mayonnaise

Shop Now

Upscale condiment brand Sir Kesington’s, known for its delectable ketchup and mustard, has added mayo to its lineup.

The avocado oil version is made with organic, certified-humane, free-range eggs and simple seasonings, including a hint of lime.


Better Body Foods Avocado Oil Mayovia amazon.com

Better Body Foods Avocado Oil Mayo

Shop Now

Another traditional-style mayo, this product is made with avocado oil, egg yolks, vinegar, and seasonings.

Like the others, it’s carb free, but Better Body Foods is particularly low in sodium, with just 80 milligrams per tablespoon.

Tips for making your own avocado oil mayo

As you can see, one disadvantage of commercial avocado oil mayo can be its price.

Compared with $4 for a 30-ounce jar of traditional mayo, an avocado oil variety can run about $8 per 12-ounce jar. But you can save money by whipping up a batch of your own.

One of my favorite recipes calls for a simple blend of whole avocado, aquafaba (the liquid from canned chickpeas), vinegar, and seasonings.

Other recipes combine avocado oil with plant milk, lemon juice, ground mustard, and seasonings.

If you DIY it, make small batches to use immediately, and experiment with a variety of herbs, spices, and other flavorful add-ins.

Whether store-bought or homemade, avocado mayo is a delicious way to add color, flavor, texture, and nutrition to a variety of meals, snacks, and treats.

Sources

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD
Cynthia Sass is a three-time New York Times best-selling author, writer, recipe developer, and practitioner, with master's degrees in both nutrition science and public health. One of the first registered dietitians to become a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, she has consulted for five professional sports teams in the NBA, NHL, and MLB. In her private practice Sass counsels a wide range of clients. She has worked with Oscar, Grammy, and Emmy winners, professional athletes across a variety of sports, Fortune 500 CEOs, executives, entrepreneurs, and many other high-performance people. She is also the nutrition consultant for UCLA's Executive Health Program. Sass has appeared on numerous national TV shows, including The Today Show, Good Morning America, The Rachael Ray Show, The Martha Stewart Show, The Dr. Oz. Show, The Biggest Loser, Nightline, and many others. In addition to her degrees, Sass has formal training in plant-based, organic culinary arts and mindfulness meditation. She is also a Certified LEAP Therapist and is working toward certification through the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Academy. She specializes in high performance nutrition and plant-based eating, and is based in Los Angeles.