5 Calorie-Bomb Salads Ruining Your Diet (And What to Eat Instead)

Think all salads are slimming? Some salads can pack a thousand or more calories from unhealthy dressing and toppings. Here, from the ‘Stop & Drop Diet,’ how to STOP picking fattening salads and start picking slimming salads to DROP weight fast.

stop and drop saladsShaneWThompson/iStock

The number one caution with salads is: Pay attention to the dressing. In researching my book Stop & Drop Diet, I came across a lot of restaurant websites that list the calories and nutrition in their salads, with and without dressing. What an eye-opener! Salad dressing can add hundreds of calories to a pretty innocent-sounding salad. Those little packets have too much dressing (of course it’s hard not to use it all), and the dressing tends to be packed with calories.

In fact, many of the salads I recommend don’t include dressing at all. I find that just the addition of a few flavorful ingredients like olives or artichokes can add enough oomph that dressing isn’t even needed. In other cases, just a few dashes of vinegar (try red wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar) or a squeeze of lemon juice does the trick. At home, you can give your salad a few sprays of oil from a Misto or pressurized can, toss it, and then sprinkle with vinegar and fresh herbs. The oil softens the sharpness of the vinegar. If you really miss having a creamy dressing, try my secret: 0% plain Greek yogurt blended with some fresh herbs!

My second caution pertains to toppings. Some salad toppings should come with warning signs because they’re so high in fat and calories and have very little that is good for health or weight loss. I’m talking to you, fried croutons, fried wonton noodles, crumbled bacon, shredded or crumbled cheese, and candied nuts. Instead, I enjoy a bit of avocado or nuts and seeds for MUFAs.

Finally, when I have a salad as my meal, it has to have protein to be balanced and satisfying. Nothing fancy here, maybe grilled chicken breast, lean steak, or salmon. My tuna is always packed in water, not oil, and I like to keep a couple of pouches handy for a quick addition to a garden salad.

Here, take a look the shocking number of calories you can save when you start making savvier salad choices.

Stop: Cheesecake Factory Small Salad Caesar with Chicken (980 calories)
Start: Au Bon Pain Chicken Caesar Asiago (no dressing, 250 calories) (pictured below)

stop and drop chicken caesar saladCourtesy Stop & Drop Diet

Stop: Applebee’s Oriental Grilled Chicken Salad (1290 calories, 82 g fat)
Start: Half size California Pizza Kitchen Chinese Chicken Salad (395 calories 18 g fat) (pictured below)

stop and drop chinese chicken saladCourtesy Stop & Drop Diet

Stop: Potbelly Uptown Salad, with Potbelly Vinaigrette (624 calories, 42 g fat)
Start: Denny’s Cranberry Apple Chicken Salad, with balsamic vinaigrette (360 calories 9 g fat) (pictured below)

stop and drop dennys waldorf saladCourtesy Stop & Drop

Stop: Panera Chicken Cobb with Avocado, with BBQ ranch dressing (800 calories, 62 g fat)
Start: Cosi Cobb Salad—Lighter Version (538 calories 33 g fat) (pictured below)

stop and drop cobb saladCourtesy Stop & Drop Diet

Stop: Applebee’s seasonal Berry and Spinach Salad (620 calories)
Start: Panera Greek Salad, no dressing (370 calories) (pictured below)

stop and drop greek saladCourtesy Stop & Drop Diet

stop and drop bookReader’s Digest’s Editor in Chief Liz Vaccariello calls her latest book, Stop & Drop Diet, her easiest plan ever. The book and online course teach you how to stop eating unhealthy versions of the foods you love so you can drop up to five pounds in the first five days—and keep losing. You’ll get a mix-and-match 21-day meal plan designed for weight loss and balanced nutrition, plus hundreds of easy weight loss tips and tricks via videos, quizzes, slideshows, and other interactive tools. Learn more and buy the book and course here.

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Originally Published in Reader's Digest

Liz Vaccariello
Liz Vaccariello is the Editor-in-Chief of Parents magazine, the 2.2 million rate-base title. In addition, she is currently the Group Editorial Director for Parents Latina and Meredith's lifestyle titles including Shape, Real Simple, InStyle, Martha Stewart Living, and Health. Vaccariello has led many of the media industry's most recognizable brands, developing content across print, digital and social channels. Prior to joining Meredith, Vaccariello held numerous executive editorial roles including serving as the Chief Content Officer for Reader's Digest. She has also served as Editor-in-Chief of Rachael Ray Every Day; Editor-in-Chief of Prevention; Executive Editor of Fitness; and Editor-in-Chief of Cleveland Magazine. Vaccariello regularly appears on national broadcast media including The Today Show, CBS This Morning, Good Morning America, and Dr. Oz. She is the author of nine best-selling books, including the #1 New York Times bestselling Flat Belly Diet! She has received numerous awards and honors over her distinguished career and is a frequent speaker at major summits presented by the MPA, Folio, MIN, and Digiday among others. Vaccariello, who is the parent of twin daughters, earned a BA in Communications with Distinction from the University of Michigan and lives in New Jersey with her family.