This Iconic Oatmeal Brand Just Recalled Oat, Cereal and Granola Products in All 50 States

The Quaker recall contains items marketed under several other recognizable consumer brands since all fall under the same parent company.

Oatmeal is great for your heart—but an announcement this week suggests that depending on what brand you buy, you may want to pay attention to whether it’s causing you symptoms.

I Had Oatmeal Every Day for a Week—Here’s What Happened

An advisory was announced on January 31, 2024 adding another product to the recall update issued January 11, 2024 following the original December 15, 2023 Quaker Oats Company recall, which pulled multiple Quaker products from shelves at major retailers across the country. The reason for the December recall that the company cited was concern over certain products that had the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella

The January 31 recall added Quaker Chewy Dipps Llama Rama to the recall. Product details are as follows, via the United States Food & Drug Administration: UPC 030000569177, 1.05 ounce six-count, Best Before date February 10 or February 11, 2024. More details may be found here.

The recalled products had been sold in all 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, and Saipan in the U.S. commonwealth. However, the announcement didn’t reveal what had led to the discovery of the possible contamination.

The December 2023 recall included the following Quaker granola bar products:

  • Quaker Big Chewy Bars of multiple flavor varieties
  • Quaker Chewy Bars
  • Quaker Chewy Bars Less Sugar
  • Quaker Chewy Dipps
  • Quaker Chewy Mini Dipps
  • Chewy Dipps

and Quaker granola cereals:

  • Puffed Granola
  • Simply Granola
  • Protein Granola
  • Plus multiple snack mixes, including those with Frito-Lay branding (as both Quaker and Frito-Lay are owned by PepsiCo)

These products bore several different “best before” dates running through October 2024 and could be identified by their UPCs.

At the time of the December Quaker recall, no illnesses had been reported, and the company emphasized that the recall only applied to the specific product listed. “NO OTHER Quaker products are impacted,” read the announcement.

Now this past Thursday, a second list of recalled Quaker products was released that included additional recalled products (see the announcement for the specific flavors, brand names, and varieties):

  • Quaker Chewy Granola Bars
  • Quaker Chewy Granola Breakfast Cereal
  • Quaker Oatmeal Squares
  • Cap’n Crunch Treats Bars & Cereal Bars
  • Cap’n Crunch Instant Oatmeal
  • Gatorade Protein Bars
  • Munchies Snack Mix
  • Gamesa Marias Cereal

“Best before” dates for the updated recall start as early as January 2024 but run throughout this year and range across the products, which can all be identified by their unique UPCs listed in the notice. 

The company asks that anyone with these products dispose of them or return them to their place of purchase. Questions should be directed to Quaker Consumer Relations at 1-800-492-9322, or people can visit www.quakergranolarecall.com for more information and to request a refund for any recalled items they have purchased.

As stated on the website set up to address the recall, the company notes that items not included in the recall and reportedly safe to consume are:

  • Quaker Oats
  • Quaker Instant Oats
  • Quaker Grits
  • Quaker Oat Bran
  • Quaker Oat Flour
  • Quaker Rice Snacks

Common symptoms of Salmonella infection

If you have eaten any of the recalled products and develop diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps or other symptoms, be sure to contact a healthcare provider for advice. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), symptoms of eating contaminated food can begin in as little as six hours, though it could take several days in some cases. Elderly individuals, those with weakened immune systems, children, and pregnant women could experience more serious illnesses that may potentially require hospitalization.

Meaghan Cameron, MS
Meaghan has more than 15 years of experience in writing and editing food, travel, fitness, sports, and lifestyle material. Her professional journey began at Reader's Digest, where she honed her skills and developed a passion for creating engaging content. Throughout her career, she has contributed her expertise to renowned platforms such as Food Network, Martha Stewart, Outside Television, and Eat This, Not That! Additionally, Meaghan has valuable experience in radio and video production. Before entering the world of content creation, Meaghan spent more than a decade working in the restaurant industry. This hands-on experience has provided her with insider knowledge and secrets about the workings of the industry. Meaghan holds a bachelor's degree in English from the State University of New York (SUNY) Purchase and a master's degree in publishing from Pace University.