8 Things You Should Always Do When You Have Sex in the Summer

It's not your imagination—a rise in temperature can cause your sex drive to do the same. Here's how to make the most of the steamy, summertime sex ahead.

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couple in a tent doing Things You Should Always Do When You Have Sex In The Summer
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If the thought of summer around the corner gets you excited in more ways than one, you’re not alone. In fact, a 2013 study done by researchers at Villanova University revealed that the most sex-related Google searches take place during the months of June and July. 

According to one 2018 study, vitamin D exposure plays a powerful factor in how likely you are to want to get it on—but what happens when it’s too hot to even think about having sex? If you’re weathering the summer sans air conditioning, chances are the last thing you want is to be touched.

By avoiding skin contact as much as possible, or adding in elements to keep your body cool during sex, there are ways to beat the heat and make the most of the summer days ahead. To learn more, we spoke with Vice President of Education at Planned Parenthood, Sara C. Flowers, DrPH and Emily Morse, Doctor of Human Sexuality, host of the award-winning sexuality podcast “Sex With Emily” and author of the June 2023 book Smart Sex: How to Boost Your Sex IQ and Own Your Pleasure. Here are their pointers on how to best enjoy sex in the summer:

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1. Make use of your shower or pool

Whether or not you have a shower or a bathtub, Dr. Morse says hitting the water with your partner is one helpful way to cool yourself down before or after sex—or it can even be the main event. (Bonus points if you bring along some waterproof sex toys.) This could also be as simple as a backyard skinny dipping session, or an impromptu outdoor plunge in a lake during a hike. 

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hand holding two ice cubes to For Temperature Play During Sex In The Summer
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2. Break out the ice cubes

Summer is the perfect time to experiment with temperature play, which is generally the use of hot or cold items or liquids to stimulate arousal. “Ice cube play is something that I often recommend just to mix it up,” says Dr. Morse. “Whether it’s for oral sex or you want to do something different, like blindfolding your partner and using an ice cube, it’s just a fun way to play with sensation.”

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Close Up Of Messy Bed Sheet And Blanket In Morning Sunlight
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3. Put your sheets in the freezer (yes, really!)

While your air conditioner is one appliance working to keep your abode chilled enough to heat up your sex life, there’s another that doesn’t get enough credit: Your refrigerator. According to Dr. Morse, one way to beat the heat and stay cool during the summer is to have sex in front of the refrigerator. She also recommends putting your clean sheets in the fridge or freezer before making your bed so you’re laying down on cooled-off sheets. (Uh, genius much?) 

Close up of african american woman drinking water
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4. Stay hydrated

The best way to beat dehydration is to drink before you get thirsty—but during summer, this is particularly important. “Without realizing it, we can get dehydrated more easily in warmer weather, so keep that water bottle within reach,” says Dr. Flowers. 

A good rule of thumb? Keep water at the side of your bed the next time you’re about to get hot and heavy with your partner and refuel with electrolytes after. 

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Lesbian couple legs lying on bed at home
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5. Get creative with positions

For those days when the thought of having skin contact with another person feels entirely unappealing, why not let mutual masturbation come to the rescue? Not only can watching your partner be a turn on, but according to Dr. Morse—you can learn more about what your partner likes by watching them.

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6. Be mindful of sexual health 

According to Dr. Flowers, UTI rates tend to be higher in the summer. This is in part due to an increase in sweating and not consuming enough water.  In addition to properly hydrating, you’ll want to practice other methods of hygiene to avoid UTIs, such as wiping from front to back after using the bathroom if you have a vulva, wearing cotton underwear, and avoiding sitting in wet items—like swimsuits—for long periods of time, since it creates an environment where bacteria can thrive. 

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Summer Sex Toys
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7. Toys are your friend

Whether you already have a drawer filled with sex toys or have yet to find out what all the buzz is about, summer is the perfect time to explore. One suggestion from Dr. Morse: Take things outside of the bedroom with a wearable vibrator, like We-Vibe’s Moxie+, which is worn inside underwear and can be controlled by an app or remote control. Dr. Morse suggests playing around with cooling lubes, nipple balms, and arousal gels as other ways to beat the summer heat. 

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Gay Man Kissing His Partner On The Head
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8. Connect with your partner

Taking a vacation with your partner during the summer is one way to reconnect and spend quality time together. According to Dr. Morse, one of the best times for couples to have conversations about their sex life is when they’re on a road trip. With minimal eye contact and nothing but time, it can be a helpful space for both parties to discuss their desires. You can even download her free worksheet to guide you through discussion around needs, boundaries, curiosities, and desires.

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Sources

National Institutes of Health: "Seasonal variation in internet keyword searches: a proxy assessment of sex mating behaviors"

Cision PR Newswire: "Cloudy With a Chance of Sex? New Trojan® Survey Links Wet Weather with Higher Sexual Frequency and Satisfaction"

National Institutes of Health: "The effect of low vitamin D status on sexual functioning and depressive symptoms in apparently healthy men: a pilot study"

Dame: "Mutual Masturbation: A Guide"

Jayla Andrulonis
Jayla Andrulonis is a freelance writer, editor, and copywriter based in Austin, Texas. She previously worked as a e-commerce writer at Meredith, where she contributed content across brands including InStyle, Travel Leisure, People, Real Simple, Shape, Health, and more. When not reporting the latest health and wellness trends or dishing on the products currently in her shopping cart, she's most likely to be found adventuring outside with her rescue dog, Lou, or somewhere on the nearest dancefloor playing house music.